where academic investigation +
christian faith +
service to others unite

People with degrees in communication work in a wide range of occupations: advertising, education, healthcare, human resources, marketing, organizational consulting, motivational speaking, performing arts/drama, public relations, newspaper, radio, television, film, sports promotion, politics, campaign management, and pharmaceutical sales. Recent La Sierra University graduates have entered graduate programs in Communication, Family and Marriage Therapy, Law, and Journalism. In addition to a broad education and outstanding communication skills, knowledge about a specific subject is often important. Depending on the occupation, we encourage students to combine Communication with a second major to prepare for careers in areas such as law, politics, science, education, business, management, and marketing. 

Educational Qualifications

 Employers in the field of journalism generally prefer workers who have a bachelor’s degree in journalism or communications and have experience from an internship or from working on a college newspaper. Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree with coursework in public relations, journalism, communications, English, and business. For public relations management positions, a bachelor’s degree in public relations, communication, or journalism is generally required. In addition, some employers prefer a master’s degree in public relations or journalism. In 2010, one-fourth of public relations managers held a master’s degree. 

Job Outlook

Employment of reporters and correspondents is expected to moderately decline by 8 percent from 2010 to 2020. Declines are expected because of the consolidation of news organizations, decreases in the readership of newspapers, and declines in viewership for many news television shows. Employment of public relations specialists is expected to grow 23 percent during the same period, faster than the average for all occupations. Employment of public relations managers is expected to grow 16 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Organizations are increasingly emphasizing community outreach, customer relations, and social media as ways to enhance their reputation and visibility.

Entering Salary

In 2012, the average annual wage in California for reporters and correspondents was $49,700 with most people making between $25,330 and $88,000. For broadcast news analysts, the average starting salary was $31,050 with an annual average of $94,290. For advertising sales agents, the average annual wage in California was $67,630 with most people making between $27,270 and $127,700.

In 2012, the average annual wage in California for reporters and correspondents was $49,700 with most people making between $25,330 and $88,000. For broadcast news analysts, the average starting salary was $31,050 with an annual average of $94,290. For advertising sales agents, the average annual wage in California was $67,630 with most people making between $27,270 and $127,700. The median annual wage for producers and directors was $68,440 with salaries ranging from $32,140 to $166,400.

In 2012, the average annual wage in California for reporters and correspondents was $49,700 with most people making between $25,330 and $88,000. For broadcast news analysts, the average starting salary was $31,050 with an annual average of $94,290. For advertising sales agents, the average annual wage in California was $67,630 with most people making between $27,270 and $127,700.

Career information adapted from:

  • U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2013). Occupational Outlook Handbook. Retrieved from http://www.bls.gov/ooh

Contact and Location

communication@lasierra.edu

951.785.2666
Gladwyn Hall, Room 113