General Studies   (52 units, 20 upper-division)

Through four thematic areas and a senior seminar, the General Studies curriculum provides broad disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge necessary for personal and communal success in a complex world.

A maximum of four units from the required courses of the student's major and up to eight units from the required cognates of the student's major can be applied to General Studies.  Liberal Studies majors, individual majors (CAS), and customized majors (ZSB) may apply up to 12 units from the major to the University Studies requirements.

THEME I - SOCIAL SCIENCES (SSCI) - 8 UNITS

Identity, Citizenship and Globalization  Identity, Citizenship, and Globalization focuses on issues of the development of individual and group identity, issues of citizenship in the contemporary world, and the ways globalization is changing both identity and the meaning and practice of citizenship.  Students must take one of the following SSCI theme courses and 4 units from Social Science breadth courses. 

Social Science (SSCI) and Theme Courses (4 Units)

Globalization, Identity and Citizenship  Interdisciplinary courses focusing on citizenship and identity in a multicultural and global context.

SSCI 204    Growing Up in America (SL)

SSCI 205     Identity and Society (SL)

SSCI 206     Childhood in Global Perspective

SSCI 207     Gender and Law in Contemporary Society

Directed study, alternate courses, or course substitutions are not allowed for SSCI courses. 

THEME II - ARTS AND HUMANITIES (HUMN) 12 UNITS

Culture and Context  Culture and Context focuses on cultural production and cultural life both in the United States and globally.  It encourages students to understand cultural production within its historical, social and economic context.  (Students must take one of the following HUMN theme courses and two of the arts and humanities breadth courses for a total of 12 units.)

Arts and Humanities (HUMN) Theme Courses (4 Units)

Exploring Culture  Interdisciplinary courses focusing on cultural production in a multicultural context with emphasis on technological, social and economic factors in culture.

HUMN 104     Exploring American Culture Through Literature and Film

HUMN 105     Exploring American Culture Through Visual and Performing Arts

HUMN 106     Perspectives on Modern Culture

Directed study, alternate courses, or course substitutions are not allowed for HUMN courses. 

THEME III - RELIGIOUS BELIEFS AN PRACTICE (RLGN) - 16 UNITS

Religious Beliefs and Practice  Religious Beliefs and Practice focuses on the varieties of religious beliefs and practices, including a foundation in Adventism.  It encourages students to make careful decisions about their own religious faith and practice.  The university encourages students to study religion in all four areas of Theme III.

A. Spiritual Experience and Expressions (0-4 units)

RELG 235     Introduction to Religious Studies

RELG 237     World Religions

RELG 267     Religious Faith and Life

RELT 464      Religious Development and Nurture

RLGN 305     The Experience of Religion in Three Cultures

B. Beliefs and Heritage (4 units)

RELH 483     History of Seventh-day Adventism

RELT 104     Introduction to Christianity

RELT 106     Introduction to Seventh-day Adventist Beliefs

RELT 245     Christian Beliefs

RELT 434     Dimensions of Salvation

RELT 453     Christian Theology

RLGN 304     Adventism in Global Perspective

C. Scripture (4 units)

RELB 104     Jesus and the Gospels

RELB 206     Sacred Texts: The Old Testament Scriptures

RELB 207     Sacred Texts: The New Testament Scriptures

RELB 309     Readings in Scripture

RELB 424     Old Testament Prophets

RELB 445     Old Testament Archeology

RELB 446     New Testament Archeology

D. Religion and Society (0-4 units)

RELE 205     Biblical Ethics in the Modern World

RELE 447    Religion and Society

RELE 455     Christian Understanding of Sexuality

RELE 459     Issues in Religious Ethics

Every student must take RLGN 304 or RLGN 305 plus 12 additional units, 4 of which must be Theme IIIB and 4 of which must be Theme IIIC.  Religious studies majors and/or students completing the pre-seminary program who fulfill all sections of Theme III with required courses from the major/program will have met the requirements for Theme III by completing an RLGN class, and 8 additional units of approved University Studies courses in any of the theme areas.

THEME IV - NATURAL SCIENCES (NSCI) - 12 Units

Scientific Inquiry exposes students to laboratory science, the relationship between science and society, and the philosophical foundations of scientific inquiry.  It allows students to engage in the practice of science while encouraging them to think about the role of science in society and science's potential and limitations in creating usable knowledge.  Students will take 4 units of NSCI interdisciplinary theme courses, 4 units of Life Science, and 4 units of Physical Science.  One of these courses must include a lab.

Natural Science (NSCI) Theme Courses (4 Units)

Exploring the philosophical underpinnings of scientific practice.  Upper division, interdisciplinary courses including philosophy of both the natural and the social sciences.

NSCI 404     Humans and the Environment

NSCI 405     Scientific Thinking and Religious Belief

NSCI 406     Nature and Human Values

NSCI 407     Religion and Rationality

Directed study, alternate courses, or course substitutions are not allowed for NSCI courses. 

SENIOR SEMINAR - 4 units

The senior seminar culminating the University Studies Program.  Analyzing religious, moral, and social issues within the student's major program of studies, students will reflect on their own faith as they apply theoretical principles to specific problems of contemporary life.  Students will integrate their values with their academic experiences and their professional aspirations by drawing on their service and knowledge.  Students will examine their commitments to service as socially responsible members of their various communities.

UNST 404     Senior Seminar:  Religion, Values & Social Responsibility

Directed study, alternate courses, or course substitutions are not allowed for UNST 404.

Students wishing to take another UNST 404 class, including UNST 404U, instead of the departmental UNST 404 course must petition the academic variance committee for permission and will need written support from their department chair.  Failure to follow this procedure may result in the UNST 404 course not meeting the University Studies requirement.

A student must receive a grade of C or better in order for a class to count as a prerequisite for another course.  This applies to both individual and sequenced classes unless otherwise specified.

HUMN

Each of the Humanities courses introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural texts produced in the United States. Students use these skills in response to interdisciplinary explorations of contested social, cultural, religious, political, and economic dimensions of American life.

HUMN 104: Exploring American Culture through Literature (4) With a focus on American literature and film, this course seeks to make La Sierra University students educated participants in the creation and evolution of American culture. To achieve this fundamental objective, the course introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural “texts” produced in the United States. Students then learn to use these skills and respond to specific explorations of contested dimensions of culture such as religion, society, culture, politics, and economics.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 111 or 124

HUMN 105: Exploring American Culture through Visual and Performing Arts (4) With a focus on American visual and performing arts, this course seeks to make La Sierra University students educated participants in the creation and evolution of American culture. To achieve this fundamental objective, the course introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural “texts” produced in the United States. Students then learn to use these skills and respond to specific explorations of contested dimensions of culture such as religion, society, culture, politics, and economics.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 111 or 124

HUMN 106: Perspective on Modern Culture (4) This course seeks to make La Sierra University students educated participants in the creation and development of culture through an awareness of the forces that shape and influence modern culture. To achieve this fundamental objective, the course introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural ‘texts’ and asks some of the people in modern society who are actively involved in the creation and shaping of culture to dialog and provide insight into this fascinating and creative process. Students then learn to apply these skills and respond to the guest speakers and lecturers in active discussion and dialogue with the goal of synthesizing a personal voice or interpretation of the products of culture in today’s world.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 111 or 124

SSCI

Each SSCI class introduces students to issues of development, childhood, adolescence, parenting, and identity formation through factors such as race, religion, environment, etc. A major goal of each class is to encourage students to think about and debate important issues raised in class.

SSCI 204: Growing Up in America (4) An interdisciplinary study of issues associated with childhood, adolescence and parenting with particular attention to sociocultural [social, cultural, and diversity] factors in the United States that affect development. The class paints a picture of childhood in the United States and, at the same time, focuses on factors that optimize the development of children. At the end of the class, students should not only be knowledgeable about the issues surrounding childhood in this country but have reflected about their responsibility as citizens and future parents.

  • This is a Service-Learning Course.
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

SSCI 205: Identity in Society (4) An exploration of relationships among individuals, social groups and institutions, emphasizing the uses of power and authority and the roles of oral communication and networking in constructing social ties and mediating disputes. Major social groups such as the state, the workplace, the school, the church and the family are examined from the perspectives of politics, economics, education, religion and science.

  • This is a Service Learning Course.
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

SSCI 206: Childhood in Global Perspective (4) An interdisciplinary survey of issues impacting the development of children around the world, with particular emphasis on developing regions and non-Western contexts. The course will consider children’s health and well being within the context of familial, cultural, economic and political systems, and how these are affected by global economic and political focus. By the end of the class, students should not only be knowledgeable about the issues surrounding childhood, but have reflected about their responsibility as citizens of the world.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

SSCI 207: Gender and Law in Contemporary Society (4) This course is a general study of how issues of gender and law interact in determining how societies construct and enforce expectations concerning relations between the sexes. It will cover historic gender-driven court cases as well as contemporary American law and how it engages issues of gender-related behaviors and rights. This course will also look at some global concerns about legal discrimination against women.  It will also include an investigation of the aspects of human perception and memory related to gender factors and the effects of socio-cultural traditions on eyewitness interpretation and testimony.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

RLGN

RLGN courses encompass the study of religious experience and theological reflection in a Christian/Seventh-day Adventist context. They are intended to educate students, personally and socially, in various kinds of religious expression, and to encourage the study of theological themes and their implications for life in the 21st century.

RLGN 304: Adventism in Global Perspective (4) An interdisciplinary study of Adventism from its inception in nineteenth-century New England to its present situation as a multicultural community of faith, including major figures and historical turning points. The course traces the development of Adventist beliefs and their relationships to those of other Christian denominations. The course also considers various aspects of the Adventist lifestyle; surveys the principal Adventist enterprises, such as health care, education, media and missions; and, looks at Adventist spirituality and the problems it encounters in a predominantly secular environment.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124;
  • Restriction:  Students must have junior or senior standing 

RLGN 305: The Experience of Religion in Three Cultures (4) An examination of the phenomena of religious belief and experience, and a study of the theologies and institutions that formalize belief, establish community, and insure their preservation and perpetuation. Special attention is given to Christianity and to two of the following: Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Animism. The course interacts with the contemporary world by exploring ways of developing relevant, persuasive individual and communal value systems and the influence of these systems on individual and community judgments and choices.  Not open to students with credit in RELT 237. 

  • Prerequisite:  ENGL 113 or 124
  • Restriction:  Students must have junior or senior standing  

NSCI

Each of the NSCI courses critically examines science in light of religious, philosophical and ethical issues. A major goal of each course is to lead both science and non-science students to understand both the importance and the limitations of science.

NSCI 404: Humans and the Environment (4) An interdisciplinary survey of issues impacting the environment. The course will consider environmental ethics and/or moral leadership in issues such as ecology, environmental resources, resource management, health and the environment, pollution, etc., and how ethics and/or leadership impacts the idea of creation as the grounding of Christian environmental concerns. A major goal is to help students understand the importance of their role as responsible citizens in the content of environmental ethics.

  • Prerequisites: ENGL 113 or 124; CPTG 117, MATH 115, 121 or 155.
  • Restriction: Students must have junior or senior standing.
  • Additional Requirements: 4 units that fulfill either Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements 

NSCI 405: Scientific Thinking and Religious Belief (4) This course is an introductory study of the nature of scientific thinking, its various kinds of interactions with religious belief, and its impact on contemporary issues. A major goal is to lead both science and non-science students to understand both the importance and limitation of science.

  • Prerequisites: ENGL 113 or 124; CPTG 117, MATH 115, 121 or 155.
  • Restriction: Students must have junior or senior standing.
  • Additional Requirements: 4 units that fulfill either Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements 

NSCI 406: Nature and Human Values (4) This course is an introductory study of the ways humans try to make sense out of the nature of the universe and their place in it. The relationships between science and religion are a prominent theme of the course. A major goal is to lead both science and non-science students to understand both the importance and limitations of science.

  • Prerequisites: ENGL 113 or 124; CPTG 117, MATH 115, 121 or 155.
  • Restriction: Students must have junior or senior standing.
  • Additional Requirements: 4 units that fulfill either Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements 

NSCI 407: Religion and Rationality (4) An introductory study of the relationship between rational reflection and religious conviction. This course will focus particularly, but not exclusively, on links between the methods appropriate to natural scientific analysis and those useful for the assessment of religious claims. It will also examine the substantive implications of the findings of the natural sciences for religious belief and of religious beliefs for judgments in the natural sciences. A major goal is to help students understand the importance and limitations of the natural sciences.

  • Prerequisites: ENGL 113 or 124; CPTG 117, MATH 115, 121 or 155.
  • Restriction: Students must have junior or senior standing.
  • Additional Requirements: 4 units that fulfill either Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements 

UNST 404: Senior Seminar: Religion, Values, and Social Responsibility (4) The senior seminar culminating the University Studies program. Analyzing religious, moral, and social issues within the student’s major program of studies from a Christian perspective.  Students will have the opportunity to critique this perspective and reflect on their own faith as they apply theoretical principles to specific problems of contemporary life. Students will integrate their values with their academic experiences and their professional aspirations by drawing on their service and knowledge. Students will examine their commitments to service as socially responsible members of their various communities.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124
  • Restriction: Students must have junior standing.

Foundational Studies (19-28 units)  The foundational studies curriculum provides the competencies, basic skills and knowledge necessary for success within the student’s discipline and as a broadly trained citizen of the world. 

A student must receive a grade of C or better in order for a class to count as a prerequisite for another course and for the class to count towards fulfilling the Foundational Studies requirement.  This applies to both individual and sequenced classes unless otherwise specified.

Foundational requirements, other than upper division argumentation and inquiry requirements, must be completed before a student's senior contract can be approved.

I. UNST 101 – Freshman Seminar (2 units)
Designed for first-year students and those with fewer than 24 university-level units, this seminar introduces the student to the University Studies program, basic study and social skills necessary for success at La Sierra University.

Directed study, alternate courses, or course substitutions are not allowed for UNST 101/UNST100.

II. Rhetorical Skills (4-13 units)
Rhetorical Skills focus on writing, speaking and critical-thinking abilities.  The foundational skills emphasized in this section will be reinforced in each discipline with a discipline - specific, rhetoric-intensive course.

A. Freshman Rhetoric (4-9 units)

Students must complete either option 1 or 2.

Option 1:

Three courses focusing on writing, speaking, and critical thinking.  Taught and administered by the Department of English.  Taught and administered by the Department of English.  Students must receive a minimum grade of C in each course to be permitted to go on to the next course in the Sequence. 

  • ENGL 111 – College Writing (3) 
  • ENGL 112 – College Writing (3)
  • ENGL 113 – College Writing (3)

Option 2:

Qualifying students may complete:

 ENGL 124 – Freshman Seminar in Writing (4)


B. Upper Division Rhetoric 

Students complete either option 1 or 2.

Option 1:

Upper division course(s) in the major focusing on advanced critical thinking, speaking and writing skills needed for success within the student's discipline.

*See bulletin for courses offered

Option 2: Argumentation and Inquiry (4)

Junior level course focusing on critical thinking, speaking, and writing.  Taught and administered by the department of English.  Students may enroll in:

ENGL 304 Advanced Expository Writing (4)

III. Mathematics (4 units)

Foundational mathematics focuses on problem solving, symbolic manipulation, and abstraction.  Students will learn to interpret problems symbolically, solve them using a variety of mathematical and computational methods and draw appropriate conclusions from their solutions.

CPTG 117 Problem Solving Using Computer Programming (4)

MATH 115 Applications of Mathematics(4)

MATH 121 College Algebra (4)

MATH 155 Introductory Statistics (4)

IV. World Language (4 units)

Three consecutive quarters of the same college, non-English language through level 153 or achieve the appropriate score on the language placement exam.  Students taking CLEP, BYU FLATS, or other language exam credits will receive 4 units of credit for a passing score.  In some cases, an additional 4 units may be awarded for a score demonstrating fluency above the Intermediate level.  Students may complete the required sequence of course work offered through the Department of World Languages, or, four quarters of Greek or the Hebrew sequence offered through the School of Religion.

Courses in American Sign Language may be used to meet this requirement.  Certification from an appropriate body or an equivalent number of transfer credits is required.

V. Health and Fitness (2 units)

HLSC 120 Lifetime Fitness