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PHYS 117 Introduction to Physics (4):

Emphasis on conceptual mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, sound, electricity, and optics. For students requiring general education science elective, and majors in nursing and elementary education. Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory per week.  Does not apply toward a major in physics. Prerequisite: MATH 007 or equivalent

PHYS 118 Health Science Physics (2):

Problem solving and laboratory experiments in topics of particular interest to students in allied health fields. Attention given to developing problem-solving skills. One lecture, one two-hour laboratory per week. Does not apply toward a major in physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 117 & MATH 007 or equivalent

PHYS 219 Introduction to Biophysics (1):

This course discusses the fundamental thinking process of physics using concrete examples. Students will study biophysical phenomenon through discussions, reading expert papers, watching videos, or listening to short presentations. They will learn through discussions and practice, how to write scientific abstracts for conferences and paper publication. They will be given training on how to use Library database. The different styles of writing a scientific paper will be discussed. Prerequisites: ENGL 111, 112, & 113

PHYS 231 General Physics I (4):

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, properties of matter, momentum, energy. (Recommended preparation for General Physics includes high school courses in algebra I and II, geometry, trigonometry, and physics.) Four lectures per week. Students with calculus background should enroll in the B section of the course. Students with only algebra and trigonometry background should enroll in the A section of the course. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 231L. Prerequisite for PHYS 231A: MATH 122 or equivalent. Prerequisite for PHYS 231B: MATH 132 or equivalent.

PHYS 231L General Physics I Laboratory (1):

One three-hour laboratory per week presenting experimental aspects of the topics presented in PHYS 231A or 231B. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 231. Students must earn a C or better to move to both A and B sections of PHYS 232 and PHYS 232L.

PHYS 232 General Physics II (4):

Electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC and AC properties of circuits, electromagnetic induction. Four lectures per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 232L. Prerequisite for PHYS 232A: PHYS 231A. Prerequisite for PHYS 232B: PHYS 231B

PHYS 232L General Physics II Laboratory (1):

One three-hour laboratory per week presenting experimental aspects of the topics presented in PHYS 232A or 232B. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 232. Students must earn a C or better to move to both A and B sections of PHYS 233 and PHYS 233L.

PHYS 233 General Physics III (4):

Geometrical and physical optics, harmonic motion and wave phenomena, quantum physics of the atom and nucleus. Four lectures per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 233L. Prerequisite for PHYS 233A: PHYS 232A. Prerequisite for PHYS 233B: PHYS 232B

PHYS 233L General Physics III Laboratory (1):

One three-hour laboratory per week presenting experimental aspects of the topics presented in PHYS 233A or 233B. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS 233.

PHYS 298 Directed Research (1-4):

Lower division level completion of a laboratory research project under the supervision of an on-campus faculty member or approved off-campus research supervisor. May be repeated for additional credit. Minimum three hours laboratory per week per unit of credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

PHYS 299 Directed Study (1-4):

Lower division level directed study of a problem suited to the background and experience of the student. May be repeated for additional credit. Minimum of 25 clock hours per unit required for a passing grade. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

PHYS 301 Mathematical Physics (4):

This course is a study of selected mathematical techniques of universal applicability across the different branches of theoretical physics. Emphasis is placed on the physicist’s approach to formulating and solving problems with sophisticated mathematical tools. This includes vector analysis, Fourier and Laplace transforms, differential equations in physics, and discussion of special functions and complex variables. Prerequisites: MATH 131, 132, & 133; PHYS 231, 232, & 233

PHYS 304 Astronomy (4):

Observational astronomy, the solar system, physics of stars, and stellar systems. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MATH 115 or 121. Restriction: Not open to freshmen except by consent of instructor

PHYS 307 Musical Acoustics (4):

An introduction to thefield of acoustics emphasizing sound production by musical instruments, propagation of sound from source to listener (including electronic reproduction) and psychoacoustic perception of sound. A study of room acoustics and physics of sound design. Three lectures and one two-hour lab per week. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH 121 & PHYS 117

PHYS 308 Computational Physics (2):

Introduction to computational methods for simulating physical systems. Numerical methods, which are used in solving problems in physics and chemistry, including solutions of differential equations, matrix operations and eigenvalue problems, interpolation and numerical integration, modeling of data and Monte Carlo methods. Offered every other year. Prerequisites: MATH133, PHYS233, PHYS301

PHYS 315 Modern Physics (4):

Discussion of relativity, Bohr theory, atomic structure, classical and quantum probability and measurement, wave/ particle duality, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and fundamental particles. Experiments are done to measure gamma ray spectra, the half-life of a radioactive isotope and gamma ray absorption. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PHYS233, PHYS301

PHYS 326 Human Body Mechanics (4):

The focus of this course is on the understanding of fundamental issues related to biomechanics of the human body. Anatomical and technical principles of mechanics will be applied to human movement. Topics will include scaling of mechanical properties and abilities, properties of biological materials (stress, strain, strength, etc.), linear and angular kinematics (position, velocity, and acceleration), linear and angular kinetics (force, center of mass, work, energy, impulse, and momentum). This course will include laboratory activities. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L, MATH 133, PHYS 233 & 233L

PHYS 327 Advanced Mechanics (4):

Central force motion, small oscillation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods, continuum mechanics. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PHYS 326, MATH 232

PHYS 336 Physics of Biomaterials (4):

Mechanics of biological tissues and cells, stress and strain, elasticity of bone and tissue, Newtonian fluid flow, Reynolds number, bioviscoelastic fluids and solids, Windkessel theory, muscle modeling. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L, MATH 133, PHYS 233 & 233L

PHYS 344 Quantum Physics (4):

An introduction to quantum concepts applied to atoms, nuclei, simple molecules, and solids. Schrodinger’s equation, wave mechanics, quantum theory of the one-electron atom. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH 232, PHYS 327

PHYS 346 Biomedical Imaging (4):

An introduction to the principles and applications of biomedical imaging, with emphasis on the acquisition, processing, display of imagery, and design of imaging systems. Filtering, convolution, and Fourier methods. Microscopy, x-ray, radiography, computed tomography (CT scan), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and nuclear imaging. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 &113L, MATH 133, PHYS 233 & 233L

PHYS 353 Electronics (2):

Basic concepts in electronics. An overview of circuit laws, components, troubleshooting and use of test equipment. Hands-on experience and practical applications are included. This course includes a significant amount of lab experience. Offered alternate years.

PHYS 355 Optics and Lasers (4):

Geometrical Optics: The nature and speed of light, laws of geometrical optics (reflection, refraction and dispersion), image formation by lenses and mirrors, light abberation, some optical instruments, interference of light, thin films, Michelson’s interferometer, diffraction of light, resolving power, the diffraction grating,X-ray diffraction, and polarization of light. Introduction to Laser Physics: Spontaneous and stimulated emission of radiation, Einstein’s coefficients, population inversion, laser amplification and oscillation, laser frequencies, laser rate equation, laser types (gas lasers, solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers). Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH 131, 132, & 133; PHYS 231, 232, & 233

PHYS 356 Cellular Physics (4):

Physics of biomolecules, molecular forces, structural organization of proteins, and nucleic acids; active and passive transport; Fick’s Laws; first and second laws of thermodynamics; random walk; diffusion and osmosis; elementary neurobiophysics; Nernst potential; action potential. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, MATH 133, PHYS 233 & 233L, PHYS 464

PHYS 385 Physics Seminar (1):

Informal seminars on biophysics and related topics of mutual interest to faculty and students. Seminars to assist students in preparing a formal paper in AIP style. May be repeated for a maximum of two units.

PHYS 389 Rhetorical Experiences in Physics (0):

Students majoring in biophysics enroll in this course during the quarter(s) they perform the duties of laboratory teaching assistant (TA) or tutor. A short paper responding to a set of reflective questions about their learning experience as a TA and/or tutor is required. Must be taken at least once while in residence at La Sierra University.

PHYS 415 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2):

Experimental methods and instrumentation chosen to synthesize concepts studied in advanced physics courses. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisites: PHYS 231, 232 & 233; MATH 231, 232 & 233

PHYS 464 Statistical and Thermal Physics (4):

Thermodynamic systems, heat, work, laws of thermodynamics, formal mathematical relations, cycles, phase equilibrium, and multicomponent systems. Elementary kinetic theory, introduction to microscopic view of entropy, ensemble theory, and applications of statistical mechanics. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH 131, 132, & 133; PHYS 231, 232, 233, & 301

PHYS 475 Radiation Physics (4):

Introduction to the physics of ionizing radiation and its interaction with matter, principles of radiation protection and safety, and government regulations regarding the distribution and use of radionuclides and radiation machines. Emphasis will be given on nuclear structure and radioactivity, radiation measurement and detection, biological effects of radiation, protection from overexposure, and federal and state standards. A total of five (5) laboratory exercises will give students a hands-on experience on radiation measurement and detection. This may be taken for service learning credit. Offered every other alternate years. Prerequisites: PHYS 233

PHYS 481 Electromagnetic Theory I (4):

Electrostatics: Coulomb’s law. Electric lines of force. Evaluation of electric field and potential in vacuum and with conducting and dielectric materials. Energy and forces in electrostatic systems. Boundary-value problems. Static magnetic fields: Biot-Savart’s and Ampere’s laws. Fields in magnetic materials. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH 131, 132, 133, & 232; PHYS 231, 232, & 233

PHYS 482 Electromagnetic Theory II (4):

Electromagnetic induction. Mutual and self-induction. Energy and forces in static and quasi-stationary fields. Maxwell’s equations. Conservation laws. Plane waves. Wavesguides. Radiation and reception of electromagnetic waves. Transformation of electric and magnetic fields between systems with uniform velocity. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PHYS 481

PHYS 486 Topics in Physics (1-4):

Topics in physics and biophysics selected by faculty and students to enrich and strengthen the biophysics curriculum. May not be used to replace a core or cognate requirement. May be repeated with new content for additional credit.

PHYS 494 Workshop in Physics (1-4):

Content selected to support the continuing education needs of secondary school science faculty. May be repeated with new content for additional credit. May not be applied toward a major or minor in physics.

PHYS 495 Thesis Research (3-6):

A student completing a thesis in Physics is required to complete at least six hours of research work in a physics or biophysics related area. The student must defend his thesis before a committee of three persons where two committee faculty must be from the department of physics. This committee must include the student’s academic advisor and research advisor. The student research project does not need to be original but the student must demonstrate a clear understanding of his research topic and reproduce major results. Restriction: Upper division standing

PHYS 498 Directed Research (1-4):

Upper division level completion of a laboratory research project under the supervision of an on-campus faculty member or approved off-campus research supervisor. May be repeated for additional credit. Minimum three hours laboratory per week per unit of credit. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

PHYS 499 Directed Study (2-4):

Upper division level directed study of a problem suited to the background and experience of the student. May be repeated for additional credit. A minimum of 25 clock hours per unit required for a passing grade. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor