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University Studies

SSCI

Each SSCI class introduces students to issues of development, childhood, adolescence, parenting, and identity formation through factors such as race, religion, environment, etc.  A major goal of each class is to encourage students to think about and debate important issues raised in class.

SSCI 104: Growing Up in America (4) An interdisciplinary study of issues associated with childhood, adolescence and parenting with particular attention to sociocultural [social, cultural, and diversity] factors in the United States that affect development. The class paints a picture of childhood in the United States and, at the same time, focuses on factors that optimize the development of children. At the end of the class, students should not only be knowledgeable about the issues surrounding childhood in this country but have reflected about their responsibility as citizens and future parents.

  • This is a Service-Learning Course.
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

 

SSCI 105: Identity in Society (4) An exploration of relationships among individuals, social groups and institutions, emphasizing the uses of power and authority and the roles of oral communication and networking in constructing social ties and mediating disputes.  Major social groups such as the state, the workplace, the school, the church and the family are examined from the perspectives of politics, economics, education, religion and science.

  • This is a Service Learning Course.
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

 

SSCI 106: Childhood in Global Perspective (4) An interdisciplinary survey of issues impacting the development of children around the world, with particular emphasis on developing regions and non-Western contexts.  The course will consider children’s health and well being within the context of familial, cultural, economic and political systems, and how these are affected by global economic and political focus.  By the end of the class, students should not only be knowledgeable about the issues surrounding childhood, but have reflected about their responsibility as citizens of the world.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

 

SSCI 107: Gender and Law in Contemporary Society (4) This course is a general study of how issues of gender and law interact in determining how societies construct and enforce expectations concerning relations between the sexes. It will cover historic gender-driven court cases, contemporary American law and how it engages issues of gender-related behaviors and rights, and some global concerns about legal discrimination against women. It includes the investigation of the aspects of human perception and memory related to gender factors and the effects of socio-cultural traditions on eyewitness interpretation and testimony.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124

 

HUMN

Each of the Humanities courses introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural texts produced in the United States. Students use these skills in response to interdisciplinary explorations of contested social, cultural, religious, political, and economic dimensions of American life.

HUMN 204: Exploring American Culture through Literature (4) With a focus on American literature and film, this course seeks to make LSU students educated participants in the creation and evolution of American culture.  To achieve this fundamental objective, the course introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural “texts” produced in the United States. Students then learn to use these skills and respond to specific explorations of contested dimensions of culture such as religion, society, culture, politics, and economics.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 111 or 124

 

HUMN 205: Exploring American Culture through Visual and Performing Arts (4) With a focus on American visual and performing arts, this course seeks to make LSU students educated participants in the creation and evolution of American culture. To achieve this fundamental objective, the course introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural “texts” produced in the United States. Students then learn to use these skills and respond to specific explorations of contested dimensions of culture such as religion, society, culture, politics, and economics.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 111 or 124

 

HUMN 206: Perspective on Modern Culture (4) This course seeks to make La Sierra University students educated participants in the creation and development of culture through an awareness of the forces that shape and influence modern culture. To achieve this fundamental objective, the course introduces students to basic skills of critical analysis as applied to cultural ‘texts’ and asks some of the people in modern society who are actively involved in the creation and shaping of culture to dialog and provide insight into this fascinating and creative process. Students then learn to apply these skills and respond to the guest speakers and lecturers in active discussion and dialogue with the goal of synthesizing a personal voice or interpretation of the products of culture in today’s world.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 111 or 124

 

RLGN

RLGN courses encompass the study of religious experience and theological reflection in a Christian/Seventh-day Adventist context. They are intended to educate students, personally and socially, in various kinds of religious expression, and to encourage the study of theological themes and their implications for life in the 21st century.

RLGN 304: Adventism in Global Perspective (4) An interdisciplinary study of Adventism from its inception in nineteenth-century New England to its present situation as a multicultural community of faith, including major figures and historical turning points. The course traces the development of Adventist beliefs and their relationships to those of other Christian denominations. The course also considers various aspects of the Adventist lifestyle and surveys the principal Adventist enterprises-health care, education, media and missions, as well as Adventist spirituality and the problems it encounters in a predominantly secular environment.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; junior standing

 

RLGN 305: The Experience of Religion in Three Cultures (4) An examination of the phenomena of religious belief and experience, and a study of the theologies and institutions that formalize belief, establish community and insure their preservation and perpetuation. Special attention is given to Christianity and to two of the following: Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Animism. The course interacts with the contemporary world by exploring ways of developing relevant, persuasive individual and community value systems and the influence of these systems on individual and community judgments and choices.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; junior standing
  • Not open to students with credit in RELG 237: World Religions.

 

NSCI

Each of the NSCI courses critically examines science in light of religious, philosophical and ethical issues.  A major goal of each course is to lead both science and non-science students to understand both the importance and the limitations of science.

NSCI 404: Humans and the Environment (4) An interdisciplinary survey of issues impacting the environment.  The course will consider environmental ethics and/or moral leadership in issues such as ecology, environmental resources, resource management, health and the environment, pollution, etc., and how it impacts the idea of creation as the grounding of Christian environmental concerns.  A major goal is to help students understand the importance of their role as responsible citizens in the content of environmental ethics.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; 4 unites that fulfill Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements; 4 units of mathematics that fulfill Foundational Studies III requirements. Students must have junior or senior standing.

 

NSCI 405: Scientific Thinking and Religious Belief (4) This course is an introductory study of the nature of scientific thinking, its various kinds of interactions with religious belief, and its impact on contemporary issues. A major goal is to lead both science and non-science students to understand both the importance and limitation of science.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; 4 unites that fulfill Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements; 4 units of mathematics that fulfill Foundational Studies III requirements. Students must have junior or senior standing.

 

NSCI 406: Nature and Human Values (4) This course is an introductory study of the ways humans try to make sense out of the nature of the universe and their place in it. The relationships between science and religion are a prominent theme of the course. A major goal is to lead both science and non-science students to understand both the importance and limitations of science.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; 4 unites that fulfill Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements; 4 units of mathematics that fulfill Foundational Studies III requirements. Students must have junior or senior standing.

 

NSCI 407: Religion and Rationality (4) An introductory study of the relationship between rational reflection and religious conviction. Will focus particularly, but not exclusively, on links between the methods appropriate to natural scientific analysis and those useful for the assessment of religious claims and on the substantive implications of the findings of the natural sciences for religious belief and of religious beliefs for judgments in the natural sciences. A major goal is to help students understand the importance and limitations of the natural sciences.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; 4 unites that fulfill Theme IVA or Theme IVB requirements; 4 units of mathematics that fulfill Foundational Studies III requirements. Students must have junior or senior standing.

 

UNST 404: Senior Seminar: Religion, Values, and Social Responsibility (4) The senior seminar culminating the University Studies program. Analyzing religious, moral, and social issues within the student’s major program of studies, students will reflect on their own faith as they apply theoretical principles to specific problems of contemporary life. Students will integrate their values with their academic experiences and their professional aspirations by drawing on their service and knowledge. Students will examine their commitments to service as socially responsible members of their various communities.

  • Prerequisite: ENGL 113 or 124; junior standing.
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