Lloyd Trueblood
Lloyd Trueblood, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology

Education: 

  • Ph.D., Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 2010
  • M.S., Biology, Walla Walla University, 2002
  • B.S., Zoology, Andrews University, 2000

Principal Research Interests

I am a marine invertebrate physiologist. That means I study the squishy animals in the ocean and explore how they survive.  Most of my work examines how organisms handle changing or extreme environments. Presently I am examining hypoxia (low oxygen) and hypercapnia (elevated CO2) tolerance in octopus. I am also studying the metabolism and hypercapnia tolerance of a group of pelagic tunicates called Salps. These projects aim to help elucidate the impact global warming and specifically ocean acidification will have on the marine environment.


Research Area: 

  • Environmental effects on physiological processes
  • Behavioral physiology
  • Invertebrate physiology

E-mail: ltrueblo@lasierra.edu
Phone: 951-785-2521
Building: Price Science Complex, Rm. 206


AWARDS

  • National Science Foundation, Division of Integrative Organismal Systems, $162,000, 2014-2018
  • La Sierra University, Deans Research Fund Award, $3000, 2013
  • UNOLS Early Career Scientist, $1500, 2013
  • La Sierra University, Deans Research Fund Award, $3000, 2012
  • UNOLS Chief Scientist Workshop, $1500, 2012
  • La Sierra University, Deans Research Fund Award, $3000, 2011
  • La Sierra University, Deans Research Fund Award, $3000, 2010
  • Malacolgia, $1000, 2007
  • University of Rhode Island, President’s Office, $300, 2007
  • University of Rhode Island, Dean of CELS, $450, 2007
  • University of Rhode Island, Biological Sciences, $175, Travel Award, 2006
  • University of Rhode Island, Provost's Office, $800, 2005
  • Graduate Dean’s Academic Achievement Award, Walla Walla College, 2002
  • De Hann Scholarship, Andrews University, 1999

REPRESENTATIVE PUBLICATIONS

  1. Trueblood, L.A., B.A. Seibel (2014): Slow swimming, fast-strikes: Effects of feeding behavior on scaling of anaerobic metabolism in epipelagic squid. In Press The Journal of Experimental Biology.
  2. Trueblood, L. A. and Seibel, B. A. 2013. Critical depth in the jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones I. Oxygen consumption rates and critical oxygen partial pressures. Deep-sea Res. II.
  3. Rosa, R., L.A. Trueblood, B.A. Seibel (2009) Ecophysiological influence on scaling of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of pelagic gonatid squids. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 82(5):419-429
  4. Shulman, D.J., C. Salinas, S. Camarilla-Coop, R. Ramirez-Rojo, A. Nyack, C. Elliger, Z. Lebaric, J. Payne, L. Trueblood, B. Seibel, S. Haddock (2008). Natural egg deposition by the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California and characteristics of paralarvae. The Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 88(4):759-770